Tenses in Urdu language are divided into three types: past, present and future. Each type has its own particular forms. The past tense is used to express an action or event that has already occurred, the present tense is used to express an action or event that is happening now, and the future tense is used to express an action or event that will happen in the future. Each verb has its own unique set of tenses, which must be learned in order to use the verb correctly.

Quick Summery:

  • Tenses in Urdu are Total Install on Mobile 2894+
  • Tenses in Urdu are Devolop By Burj Labs
  • Install Tenses in Urdu Your PC Using Bluestacks Android Emulator
  • Tenses in Urdu Is Size: undefined
  • This Apps Last Update On Feb 9, 2019

Tenses in Urdu Andorid App Summary

Burj Labs is the developer of this Tenses in Urdu application. It is listed under the Education category in the Play Store. There are currently more than 2894+ users of this app. The Tenses in Urdu app rating is currently 1.0. It was last updated on Feb 9, 2019. Since the app cannot be used directly on PC, you must use any Android emulator such as BlueStacks Emulator, Memu Emulator, Nox Player Emulator, etc. We have discussed how to run this app on your PC, mac, or Windows with this emulator in this article.

How To Install Tenses in Urdu For PC

Follow the simple instructions below to easily install and download Tenses in Urdu on your PC:

  • Download the Bluestacks Android emulator from the link above
  • Once the download is complete, run the .exe file to begin the installation
  • Bluestacks can be successfully installed by following the on-screen instructions
  • Launch Bluestacks once it has been installed
  • Bluestacks will ask you to sign in; you can use your Gmail ID to sign in
  • Now, look for the search bar and in the dialog box, type Tenses in Urdu and press Enter
  • Click on the most appropriate app from the search results to expand it
  • Start the installation process by clicking the Install button
  • Wait for the installation to complete
  • Now launch the Tenses in Urdu andorid App within the emulator and enjoy

Features of Tenses in Urdu for PC

of the features of a verb that, along with its syntactic environment, tells us when the action or occurrence expressed by the verb happens. For example, in the sentence “I am writing a letter”, the verb “am writing” is in the present tense, which tells us that the action expressed by the verb is happening right now. The time reference of this sentence is present time. In contrast, in the sentence “I wrote a letter”, the verb “wrote” is in the past tense, which tells us that the action expressed by the verb happened in the past. The time reference of this sentence is past time.

1. Expresses time reference with reference to the moment of speaking.
2. Tenses are usually manifested by the use of specific forms of verbs, particularly in their conjugation patterns.
3. Main tenses found in many languages include the past, present, and future.
4. Some languages have only two distinct tenses, such as past and nonpast, or future and nonfuture.
5. There are also tenseless languages, like most of the Chinese languages.
6. On the other hand, some languages make finer tense distinctions, such as remote vs recent past, or near vs remote future.
7. Tenses generally express time relative to the moment of speaking.
8. In some contexts, however, their meaning may be relativized to a point in the past or future which is established in the

Tenses in Urdu App Specification
App Name: Tenses in Urdu On Your PC
Devoloper Name: Burj Labs
Latest Version: 1.0
Android Version: 4.0
Supporting OS: Windows,7,8,10 & Mac (32 Bit, 64 Bit)
Package Name: com.tenses.in.urdu
Download: 2894+
Category: Education
Updated on: Feb 9, 2019
Get it On: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tenses.in.urdu

Tenses in Urdu App Overview and Details

In grammar, tense is a category that expresses time reference with reference to the moment of speaking.[2][3] Tenses are usually manifested by the use of specific forms of verbs, particularly in their conjugation patterns.

Main tenses found in many languages include the past, present, and future. Some languages have only two distinct tenses, such as past and nonpast, or future and nonfuture. There are also tenseless languages, like most of the Chinese languages, though it can possess a future and nonfuture system, which is typical of Sino-Tibetan languages.[4] On the other hand, some languages make finer tense distinctions, such as remote vs recent past, or near vs remote future.

Tenses generally express time relative to the moment of speaking. In some contexts, however, their meaning may be relativized to a point in the past or future which is established in the discourse (the moment being spoken about). This is called relative (as opposed to absolute) tense. Some languages have different verb forms or constructions which manifest relative tense, such as pluperfect (“past-in-the-past”) and “future-in-the-past”.

Expressions of tense are often closely connected with expressions of the category of aspect; sometimes what are traditionally called tenses (in languages such as Latin) may in modern analysis be regarded as combinations of tense with aspect. Verbs are also often conjugated for mood, and since in many cases the four categories are not manifested separately, some languages may be described in terms of a combined tense–aspect–mood (TAM) system.

The English noun tense comes from Old French tens “time” (spelled temps in modern French through deliberate archaisation), from Latin tempus “time”.[5] It is not related to the adjective tense, which comes from Latin tensus, the perfect passive participle of tendere “stretch”.

In modern linguistic theory, tense is understood as a category that expresses (grammaticalizes) time reference; namely one which, using grammatical means, places a state or action in time.[2][3] Nonetheless, in many descriptions of languages, particularly in traditional European grammar, the term “tense” is applied to series of verb forms or constructions that express not merely position in time, but also additional properties of the state or action – particularly aspectual or modal properties.

The category of aspect expresses how a state or action relates to time – whether it is seen as a complete event, an ongoing or repeated situation, etc. Many languages make a distinction between perfective aspect (denoting complete events) and imperfective aspect (denoting ongoing or repeated situations); some also have other aspects, such as a perfect aspect, denoting a state following a prior event. Some of the traditional “tenses” express time reference together with aspectual information. In Latin and French, for example, the imperfect denotes past time in combination with imperfective aspect, while other verb forms (the Latin perfect, and the French passé composé or passé simple) are used for past time reference with perfective aspect.

Not all languages have tense: tenseless languages included Chinese and Dyirbal.[7] Some languages have all three basic tenses (the past, present, and future), while others have only two: some have past and nonpast tenses, the latter covering both present and future times (as in Arabic, Japanese, and in English in some analyses), whereas others such as Greenlandic and Quechua have future and nonfuture. Some languages have four or more tenses, making finer distinctions either in the past (e.g. remote vs. recent past) or in the future (e.g. near vs. remote future). The six-tense language Kalaw Lagaw Ya of Australia has the remote past, the recent past, the today past, the present, the today/near future and the remote future.In grammar, tense is a category that expresses time reference with reference to the moment of speaking.[2][3] Tenses are usually manifested by the use of specific forms of verbs, particularly in their conjugation patterns.

Main tenses found in many languages include the past, present, and future. Some languages have only two distinct tenses, such as past and nonpast, or future and nonfuture. There are also tenseless languages, like most of the Chinese languages, though it can possess a future and nonfuture system, which is typical of Sino-Tibetan languages.[4] On the other hand, some languages make finer tense distinctions, such as remote vs recent past, or near vs remote future.

Tenses generally express time relative to the moment of speaking. In some contexts, however, their meaning may be relativized to a point in the past or future which is established in the discourse (the moment being spoken about). This is called relative (as opposed to absolute) tense. Some languages have different verb forms or constructions which manifest relative tense, such as pluperfect (“past-in-the-past”) and “future-in-the-past”.

Expressions of tense are often closely connected with expressions of the category of aspect; sometimes what are traditionally called tenses (in languages such as Latin) may in modern analysis be regarded as combinations of tense with aspect. Verbs are also often conjugated for mood, and since in many cases the four categories are not manifested separately, some languages may be described in terms of a combined tense–aspect–mood (TAM) system.

The English noun tense comes from Old French tens “time” (spelled temps in modern French through deliberate archaisation), from Latin tempus “time”.[5] It is not related to the adjective tense, which comes from Latin tensus, the perfect passive participle of tendere “stretch”.

In modern linguistic theory, tense is understood as a category that expresses (grammaticalizes) time reference; namely one which, using grammatical means, places a state or action in time.[2][3] Nonetheless, in many descriptions of languages, particularly in traditional European grammar, the term “tense” is applied to series of verb forms or constructions that express not merely position in time, but also additional properties of the state or action – particularly aspectual or modal properties.

The category of aspect expresses how a state or action relates to time – whether it is seen as a complete event, an ongoing or repeated situation, etc. Many languages make a distinction between perfective aspect (denoting complete events) and imperfective aspect (denoting ongoing or repeated situations); some also have other aspects, such as a perfect aspect, denoting a state following a prior event. Some of the traditional “tenses” express time reference together with aspectual information. In Latin and French, for example, the imperfect denotes past time in combination with imperfective aspect, while other verb forms (the Latin perfect, and the French passé composé or passé simple) are used for past time reference with perfective aspect.

Not all languages have tense: tenseless languages included Chinese and Dyirbal.[7] Some languages have all three basic tenses (the past, present, and future), while others have only two: some have past and nonpast tenses, the latter covering both present and future times (as in Arabic, Japanese, and in English in some analyses), whereas others such as Greenlandic and Quechua have future and nonfuture. Some languages have four or more tenses, making finer distinctions either in the past (e.g. remote vs. recent past) or in the future (e.g. near vs. remote future). The six-tense language Kalaw Lagaw Ya of Australia has the remote past, the recent past, the today past, the present, the today/near future and the remote future.

Whats New In this Tenses in Urdu?

✤ Updated Android Support
✤ All Tenses Added
✤ Minor Bug Fixes
✤ Functionality Improved
✤ Easy Reading Layout Added

Conclusion

In Urdu, there are three tenses: past, present, and future. Each tense is used to indicate when an action or event occurred, is occurring, or will occur. To indicate the past tense, the Urdu language uses the past tense verb form, which is typically the past tense of the English language. To indicate the present tense, the Urdu language uses the present tense verb form, which is typically the present tense of the English language. To indicate the future tense

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